Last edited by Zulkirr
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas found in the catalog.

Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas

Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas

papers presented to a conference organised by the Johnstone Centre of Parks, Recreation, and Heritage at Charles Sturt University, Albury, New South Wales, 22-24 July 1991

  • 13 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Aboriginal Studies Press in Canberra .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Australia
    • Subjects:
    • National parks and reserves -- Australia -- Management -- Congresses.,
    • Land use -- Australia -- Congresses.,
    • Aboriginal Australians -- Land tenure -- Congresses.,
    • Aboriginal Australians -- Government relations -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementedited by Jim Birckhead, Terry De Lacy and Laurajane Smith ; copy editing by Sandra De Lacy ; conference organiser, Helen Brindley.
      GenreCongresses.
      SeriesReport series / Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies,, Report series (Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies)
      ContributionsBirckhead, Jim., De Lacy, Terry., Smith, Laurajane., Brindley, Helen., Johnstone Centre of Parks, Recreation, and Heritage.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSB484.A9 A56 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiv, 390 p. :
      Number of Pages390
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1469649M
      ISBN 10085575236X
      LC Control Number93131539
      OCLC/WorldCa26251032

      Protected areas cover , km 2 (, sq mi) of Australia's land area, or about % of the total land area. The Australian Capital Territory has the highest level of protection at nearly 55% of its territory, followed by Tasmania with nearly 40% and South Australia with 25%. Lowest level of protection is in Queensland and the Northern. For Aboriginal people, protected areas are invaluable in maintaining connections to their Country. Protected areas are essential spaces to enjoy nature in all its forms, and provide a wide range of environmental, social and economic benefits to people and communities. Find out more on the Department for Environment and Water’s website.

      Aboriginal women's heritage: Wagga Wagga; The Albury-Wodonga Structure Plan: land acquisition: draft technical report / Kinnaird Hill de Rohan a Aborigines in Albury; Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas: papers presented to a conference organised by the. Taking Indigenous Protected Areas into Sea Country. In, Smyth, D. and Ward, G. (Eds) Indigenous Governance and Management of Protected Areas in Australia, Chapter 8 pp E-book published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Click here to download. Jaireth, H. and Smyth, D.

      The relevance of some aspects of Aboriginal subsistence activities to the management of national parks: with references to Martu people of the Western Desert. In: ‘Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas’. (Eds J. Birckhead, T. De Lacy and L. Smith.) pp. 75–Cited by: The involvement of Aboriginal people in the management of their traditional lands contributes to improved cultural site protection, maintenance of traditional practices that may have otherwise been excluded, and improved management of parks through the combination of traditional knowledge and contemporary science.


Share this book
You might also like
Dialogues of the dead

Dialogues of the dead

Percy Grainger

Percy Grainger

IUFRO proceedings

IUFRO proceedings

The U.P. land records manual

The U.P. land records manual

Li Ching-chao.

Li Ching-chao.

Symphonie ix

Symphonie ix

Peace Corps activities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Peace Corps activities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

water garden

water garden

fisheries today.

fisheries today.

Adventure stories for boys

Adventure stories for boys

In time and space

In time and space

Twentieth-century Russian poetry

Twentieth-century Russian poetry

Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas Download PDF EPUB FB2

The case studies presented in the book analyse a wide range of interactions between indigenous peoples and protected areas, from the old-style national parks, which have expelled indigenous peoples, to more recent initiatives that try to accommodate indigenous interests Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas book even respect indigenous rights.

Birckhead, J., T. De Lacy and L. Smith, eds. Aboriginal Involvement in Parks and Protected Areas. Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Report Series, Aboriginal Studies Press, Google ScholarCited by: 2.

In Australia, that recognition has translated into special management arrangements for some national parks which are now owned by Aboriginal people, who also control the management boards. There are currently four such parks in the Northern Territory (two of which are also listed as World Heritage areas) and negotiations are currently taking place for similar arrangements in other Australian by: 5.

6 TRIBAL PARKS AND INDIGENOUS PROTECTED AND CONSERVED AREAS: LESSONS FROM B.C. • Relationships with other governments — Declaring an IPCA and governing it means that Indigenous governments face decisions about how they want to relate to other govern-ments on all matters pertaining to the new jurisdictional declaration.

ABORIGINAL ~NVOLVEMENT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF QUEENSLAND'S NATIONAL PARKS AND OTHER PROTECTED AREAS Kirsty Davis* For more than a century, national parks and other protected areas have been managed in Queensland to protect the natural environment from degrading to increase the level of indigenous involvement in the sustainable use andFile Size: 2MB.

Aboriginal Peoples and Canada’s Parks and Protected Areas Introduction This compendium of case studies from across Canada illustrates the broad participation of Aboriginal people in diverse areas of parks and protected areas planning and management.

These case studies have been produced by the Canadian Parks Council, an organization of Canada’sFile Size: KB.

Conservation protected areas began to be established in an era of broader colonial conquest and expropriation of the lands and territories of Indigenous Peoples and local communities. Colonial administrations around the world claimed land, especially common land, for the state, without regard forFile Size: KB.

An Indigenous Protected Area, or an area of land owned and managed by Aboriginal People as a national park, may be a suitable mechanism for dealing with hunting issues in a culturally relevant way.

Indigenous Protected Areas. Indigenous protected areas (IPAs) make up about 25% of Australia’s National Reserve System. Aboriginal Peoples and Canada's Parks and Protected Areas These case studies profile innovative collaborations between aboriginal organizations, communities, park agencies, First nations and other stakeholders to conserve biodiversity and cultural heritage and share the environmental, social, cultural, educational and economic benefits of parks and protected heritage areas.

Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs) are areas of land and sea managed by Indigenous groups as protected areas for biodiversity conservation through voluntary agreements with the Australian Government. IPAs are an essential component of Australia’s National Reserve System, which is the network of formally recognised parks, reserves and protected areas across Australia.

Second, in some regions, the density and nature of settlement mean that parks and protected areas are the only tenures in which indigenous rights in land might be pursued.

South-west Queensland is. This paper examines current approaches for Parks and Protected Areas (PPA) managers in incorporating Aboriginal Traditional and Ecological Knowledge (ATEK) into their management plans. This paper focuses on two : David Cook.

The first extensive review of Indigenous involvement in protected area management, published inwas funded by the Commonwealth Government in response to the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.

3 Since that time,File Size: KB. Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas: papers presented to a conference organised by the Johnstone Centre of Parks, Recreation, and Heritage at Charles Sturt University, Albury, New South Wales, July Marine protected areas (MPAs) are inherent to international commitments to protect the oceans and have the potential to recognize, honour, and re-invigorate Indigenous rights.

Involvement of Indigenous peoples in the governance and management of MPAs, however, has received little by: Source: Aboriginal involvement in parks and protected areas / edited by Jim Birckhead, Terry De Lacy and Laurajane Smith - Canberra; Aboriginal Studies Press, ; p.

; ill., port., maps Language/Group: Kukatja people (A68) (WA SF) Language/Group: Martuwangka people (A6) (WA SH) Local call number: B B/A1. Aboriginal joint management is an arrangement between the State and traditional owners to share responsibility for the management of national parks, reserves and other areas.

Aboriginal park partnerships We engage in partnerships with Aboriginal peoples and recognise them as traditional custodians of their Country. We acquire land to establish new parks and to add to existing parks and protected areas. Deciding on land for new parks We decide what lands should be protected and acquired for the national parks system based on our conservation priorities and to best represent a variety of environments.

Useful contrasts between indigene reactions to national park creation in Canada, the USA and Australia have recently been described, and it appears that even active involvement of indigenous peoples in protected area planning and administration yields uneven results, largely because most resource management agencies are still perceived as.

Head, L., 'Australian Aborigines and a changing environment views of the past and implications for the future', in Aboriginal Involvement in Parks and Protected Areas, edited by Birckhead, J., De Lacy, T. & Smith, L. Canberra, Aboriginal Studies Press,p.

Craig, D., Environmental law and Aboriginal rights: legal framework for Aboriginal joint management of Australian national parks, in J. Birckhead, T. De Lacy and L. Smith (eds.), Aboriginal.Department of Parks and Wildlife 3 Guide to Aboriginal customary activities on Parks and Wildlife-managed lands and waters Access Aboriginal people can access most areas of Parks and Wildlife-managed lands and waters.

There are some areas that pose safety risks or are environmentally sensitive, and where Aboriginal people will need special. The results of this century-old conflict are thousands of protected areas that cannot be managed and an intractable debate over who holds the key to successful conservation in the most.